Nokia bluetooth tracking zim

 

Locating several Bluetooth users with a typical mobile phone is relatively simple: You just turn on your phone and search for every discoverable device. But you could only monitor the people moving in and out of your Bluetooth's range, which is most likely a 10-meter (33-foot) circle around you. If you wanted to track a specific address, you'd have to visually locate that person's physical device and follow it around all day, which would easily blow your cover.

So how have people used this system to track people? One of the earliest uses of Bluetooth positioning and tracking technology is the Aalborg Zoo, the largest zoological garden in Denmark. The point of installing the system was not to put the zoo 's patrons under surveillance or to see which exhibitions people went to more often. Instead, special "Bluetags" were made available to prevent parents from losing valuable belongings that tend to wander off -- their children. A parent could attach a "Bluetag" onto a child, and Bluetooth receivers around the zoo would track the child's movement.

Some people worry about others using this sort of technology illegally and maliciously. A shopping mall, for example, could install a Bluetooth surveillance system throughout its entire area to monitor the movements of Bluetooth owners. Although it wouldn't present a perfectly accurate description of a person's movement, the system could create a general map of his path and even compare how long someone stays in a certain area. With this knowledge, store owners could analyze shopper's behavior and change advertisement positions accordingly without anyone ever knowing.

Nokia bluetooth tracking zim

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Locating several Bluetooth users with a typical mobile phone is relatively simple: You just turn on your phone and search for every discoverable device. But you could only monitor the people moving in and out of your Bluetooth's range, which is most likely a 10-meter (33-foot) circle around you. If you wanted to track a specific address, you'd have to visually locate that person's physical device and follow it around all day, which would easily blow your cover.

So how have people used this system to track people? One of the earliest uses of Bluetooth positioning and tracking technology is the Aalborg Zoo, the largest zoological garden in Denmark. The point of installing the system was not to put the zoo 's patrons under surveillance or to see which exhibitions people went to more often. Instead, special "Bluetags" were made available to prevent parents from losing valuable belongings that tend to wander off -- their children. A parent could attach a "Bluetag" onto a child, and Bluetooth receivers around the zoo would track the child's movement.

Some people worry about others using this sort of technology illegally and maliciously. A shopping mall, for example, could install a Bluetooth surveillance system throughout its entire area to monitor the movements of Bluetooth owners. Although it wouldn't present a perfectly accurate description of a person's movement, the system could create a general map of his path and even compare how long someone stays in a certain area. With this knowledge, store owners could analyze shopper's behavior and change advertisement positions accordingly without anyone ever knowing.