Mobile spy 2010 911 turbo

 

After the debut of the 996-generation 911 in 1998, Porsche began making plans to enter the car into the GT3 class of the FIA, and set out to develop both the race car and the road-going version which was required by GT class homologation rules. The car debuted at the 1999 Geneva Motor Show as the first road-legal Porsche to wear a GT3 badge. As with Porsche’s previous 911 RS models, the 996 GT3 was focused on racing and became the 996-generation’s range-topping model until until a new GT2 was launched for the 2002 model year.

It hasn’t been long since the 991- generation 911 received its mid-cycle facelift, and it appears that Porsche is already working on the next-generation sports car. Our paparazzi spotted a 911 prototype being tested on public roads, and even though the model looks similar to the current-gen 911, we’re quite sure the Germans are actually testing underpinnings for the upcoming model, due to arrive sometime in 2018.

Very little is known about the next-generation 911, but word has it that the biggest changes will occur under the skin. Besides the all-turbo lineup — the Carrera gained forced induction with the 991.2 facelift — the 911 is also set to receive a hybrid drivetrain for the very first time. Although this rumor has yet to be confirmed by Stuttgart, a hybridization is a natural step for the 911 — given Porsche is already offering hybrid version of the Panamera and Cayenne, as well as the 918 supercar and the 919, Le Mans- winning race car. Of course, the gasoline powerplants will get their fair share of updates as well.

Mobile spy 2010 911 turbo

The current Porsche 911, the Type 991, made its debut at the 2011 Frankfurt Auto Show and hit the market shortly after as a 2012 model. This means we’re approaching the halfway point in the car’s life cycle, and right on cue prototypes for an updated version, the Type 991.2, have been spotted, this time with virtually zero camouflage gear (there’s only a decal hiding the details of the tail lights). The latest photos show the basic Carrera but prototypes for updated versions of the Carrera Cabriolet , Targa and Turbo have also been spotted in the past.

The front of the updated 911 is characterized by revised daytime running lights and new intakes in the bumper, possibly with an active grille function to help save fuel. At the rear we can see some new intakes at the sides of the bumper and the exhaust pipes now sit at the center. This is very different to the design used on the existing Carrera models, suggesting some serious updates under the hood as part of this mid-cycle update.

Though it’s yet to be confirmed, Porsche is expected to fit its updated Carrera models with a common turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six . The updated Carrera is expected to come with 370 horsepower on tap, up from the 350-hp rating of the current model’s 3.4-liter mill; and the updated Carrera S should have 420 hp, up from the 400-hp rating of the current model’s 3.8-liter unit.

After the debut of the 996-generation 911 in 1998, Porsche began making plans to enter the car into the GT3 class of the FIA, and set out to develop both the race car and the road-going version which was required by GT class homologation rules. The car debuted at the 1999 Geneva Motor Show as the first road-legal Porsche to wear a GT3 badge. As with Porsche’s previous 911 RS models, the 996 GT3 was focused on racing and became the 996-generation’s range-topping model until until a new GT2 was launched for the 2002 model year.

It hasn’t been long since the 991- generation 911 received its mid-cycle facelift, and it appears that Porsche is already working on the next-generation sports car. Our paparazzi spotted a 911 prototype being tested on public roads, and even though the model looks similar to the current-gen 911, we’re quite sure the Germans are actually testing underpinnings for the upcoming model, due to arrive sometime in 2018.

Very little is known about the next-generation 911, but word has it that the biggest changes will occur under the skin. Besides the all-turbo lineup — the Carrera gained forced induction with the 991.2 facelift — the 911 is also set to receive a hybrid drivetrain for the very first time. Although this rumor has yet to be confirmed by Stuttgart, a hybridization is a natural step for the 911 — given Porsche is already offering hybrid version of the Panamera and Cayenne, as well as the 918 supercar and the 919, Le Mans- winning race car. Of course, the gasoline powerplants will get their fair share of updates as well.

Great artists steal, and I’m obviously inspired by Paul Niedermeyer’s GM’s Deadly Sin series here. I am currently the owner of three Porsches, as pathetic as that may be, and I’ve experienced firsthand the many ways in which Porsche disappoints its fans and buyers. Few companies have been as comprehensively whitewashed by the media and the corporate biographers, but the truth is available to those of us who wish to look a bit harder.

We will start with the big betrayals, of course, and the unassuming fastback you see above represents perhaps the worst of Porsche’s many middle fingers to the customer base. It is a 1999 Porsche 911, known to everyone in the world as the “996”.

The 911 was never intended to last thirty-four years. The front-engine, water-cooled 928 was supposed to replace the 911 in the Seventies… but it didn’t, so the 911’s lifetime was extended another decade. The costs and inefficiencies of building a car with a Sixties architecture tortured Porsche. A complete re-engineering was necessary, and Porsche worked with Toyota to squeeze every last dollar out of the new 911’s design.

I f you were holding out for a next-gen 911 GT3 that was radically different than its predecessor, you may be out of luck. We’ve just received photos of the new 2010 GT3, and from what we can glean, it’s certainly evolutionary.

Perhaps most evolutionary is the GT3’s exterior. While our spies report the front fascia differs little from the current GT3, changes at the aft end are equally miniscule. Most visible are the new upswept taillights (introduced on the ), as well as a smooth rear bumper, now devoid of scoops or flared surfaces. These prototypes also wear a smaller rear spoiler, which resembles the single-plane wing of the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Those changes are hardly earth-shattering, but those beneath the surface may be. We’re expecting to see direct fuel injection, introduced with the 2009 Porsche 911 , added to the next GT3. Although early reports suggested the new fuel delivery system would be fitted to the current GT3’s 3.6-liter flat-six, rumor has it Porsche’s looking at a high-horsepower version of the larger 3.8-liter flat-six out of the new 911. Either way, look for the new GT3 to produce significantly more power, perhaps in the neighborhood of 440 hp.